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, it is one step closer to again, reengaging a citizen in government. and we have to use technology, it is one of those credible tools that while people are disenfranchised in what is going on in sacramento with the lack of transparency, we can have a much more service-oriented government that reengages people. >> so speaking of service orientation, what do you think that the government should do? and where should the government step aside? >> in terms of... >> what do you think is the role of government? it is a very general question. >> so, the role of government is to provide basic services that the private sector would just not provide. i mean, education, i mean, it is infrastructure, that means social services that means, giving people basic tools that they might not otherwise have. so really giving people in my mind an opportunity to succeed. and when the private sector, which can fall short in many areas are not providing, you know, basic services like food, or housing, or that is the role of government to step in. and we have to, we have to restore faith in our system of government. be
for bringing us together today and also it is a real pleasure to be here with miss dillan who is a great respectful of her party and an activist in the community. as i think that most californians know that we have spent a lot of time dealing with the issue of pension reform for the public sector workers and i think that we have reached a point where we can going forward deal with pensions in a much more sustain able fashion so that we won't see cities in particular having upwards of 25, 30 percent of the general fund having to go to pension obligations. of course, those promises already made must legally be adhered to. i have also said in a lot of time in this past year, looking at private sector employees in publicly traded corporations, who have seen their benefits wiped out and in many cases actually stolen by top executives who are shifting significant amounts of money to their benefit at the expense of those workers. >> thank you, the time limits are tough, aren't they? >> the next question for mr. leno is state proposition 35, asks if the definition of human trafficking should be
to protect the board of supervisors from appeals. so, please stop this legislation. please give all of us time to digest the memo that you just received today and we just received today, and let's go back to having some real involvement of stakeholders in crafting legislation a fresh rather than trying to amend this bad draft. thank you. >>> good afternoon, commissioners. my name is rose hill son. first of all, in this piece of legislation which is new 2012 legislation, it's not something that should be considered as an extension of the 2006 or 2010 legislation. therefore we've had millions of meetings on it, that's not the case. the first meeting i was at was the planning commission meeting on november 15th. so, this is my second one here with you. in the november 21st historic preservation commission meeting there was a big discussion about what the first approval. and therein lies the problem. if you don't know when the first discretionary approval is, no one can figure out when the notice is going to come out, from what department, what agency, and you have all kinds of agencies. airp
on the table for the public. if anyone needs an extra one, they can see us. >> could i ask a quick question to staff? there's references i'm reading in here, and you just mentioned there had been amendments made to the legislation that we have had before us, but we have not received. is that correct? >> that is correct. i would go run copies right now. i'm sorry for that. >> that's all right. we don't need to do that. >> there's one more clarification on your presentation. >> i just wanted -- i'm not sure if i understood this correctly. two things. you said that if one wanted to speak at a later e-i-r hearing, they had to have addressed the d-e-i-r hearing to speak at the later hearing? >> at the appeal hearing, that's correct. >> all right. that was one thing i wasn't clear about. and the other -- on negative declarations, it says there's no appeal to the board unless it first is appealed to the planning commission. i thought it was the other way around. it would be they appeal just to the board. but it has to first go to the planning commission. they can't directly much to the board for a
will you help us to stop worrying? >> so, absolutely, while i am a young person, i do believe that we really have an obligation to protect our seniors. and when you see services to seniors being cut, you have to realize that they have contribute to the system their entire life and this is a time that they need services even more than other moments. and when you look at what is going on, you also have to say that there is the statistic that you gave is actually the start of the baby booming population, as she growing older. so we actually need more and more services, we need to actually have people trained to provide those services as well. and so, i think, of my great aunt, who is 94 years old, who is i speak to as much as i can, when i think about what the senior population is going through and really care about their children and their future as well. >> thank you, mr. bryer. >> first off, thank you to the league of women voters and jr. voters for hosting this discussion tonight very glad to be here. i think of my grandmother and the amount of work that it took to take care of. we h
deported from this country, that is a public safety issue that all of us who live in san francisco have to deal with every day. so i really question whether one can square one of those statements with the other. i believe in the natural law from john stewart mill and other philosophers that our rights do not flow from the government, the government's rights and the government's rights flow from the citizens. and so the government should have as limited a scope as possible, not and interfere with business and not interfere with our privacy and not spy on us and generally keep the public order and that is about it. >> thank you, so following up on that one of those things that the government is involved in right now is the educational system. and california used to have an education system that was the envy of the nation. how do you feel we get that back? >> well, it is a tragedy that what used to be one of the top systems in the country is now i think, 47th according to a recent standard that i saw. the senator and folks in his party in sacramento believe that spending more is the answer
sponsored by our attorney general harris this past year, which expands asset forfet tour, it is a way for us to quickly gain resources so that we can provide services for victims and invest in greater public safety police officers and investigator to deal with these crimes. i am opposed to prop 35, number one because the author of it is the single individual, deep pocket putting this forward. it is not a citizen's initiative. never came to talk to me what was wrong or short with our bill that he had to go to the ballot and expanding the definition to those who have to register as sex offenders to include those who have not even committed a sex crime, i think delutes the benefit of our sex registry. >> i think that the support for 35 is a no-brainer. i support 35. i do agree that the problem with sex trafficking in our society in california is a very significant one. in san francisco is frankly the epi center of sex trafficking industry. and i find it interesting that the attorney general participated with the senator in his abnormal legislation and she did not do much about sex trafficking w
, so i knew that that wasn't good. >> and that was our nightmare. >> a parent came to us, we'd known her personally, the whole family, for a long time. and she told me, she asked -- i thank her for the courage it took to come forward. she said, i don't know how to tell you this, but i think there's so much going on. >> she told us her son had come to her and told her there was a picture jill had sent to him in december naked in her body and it had been passed to another boy and then to another boy and put up on the internet. >> he told me he had these pictures of jill and he was telling everybody that they were on his email account. so everybody went on the email account and they saw and they sent them to themselves just to have them just to, i don't know, just to --. >> we were very surprised when she told us about the picture. we had no idea. jill was very private, we couldn't understand why she would send something like that to a boy that she wasn't a boyfriend, it was just a friend. >> our first thought, this isn't true. we first thought this can't be true. then i thought
who walked in, tony, i'm going to put you on the spot first just because i was so upset you left us when i was mayor and we tried to keep you, but i'm so happy for oakland. but, tony, you have any comments or questions for our two esteemed panelists, particularly ruslyn who has been saying so many nice things about you. you should reciprocate. >> we also have a really big investigation going in oakland. i'm not sure -- tony is right. be nice. >> thank you, yeah, good morning, everybody. thank you very much. so we are pretty deep in an investigation about the disproportionate suspension of african american males and the reason we have been able to engage so deeply is because of the understanding that unless we take a really deep healing approach, unless we look at the root issue, bullying will persist. so we said you need to have a universal goal that you can eliminate bullying but it's really about creating a caring school community. what i would ask, this question of definition, can you, though, ask for communities to come forward with what it would look like to be, what's the
that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can urriculum in that way. but you certainly have seen superintendent caranza happened about what happens with the kinds of conversations that happen with the movie bully and there are can urriculum packages being developed. i had visions, gary, to think about how if folks decided -- and we don't play in this -- but if folks decided there could be a class on this, how you teach, life skills class, right? if we try to make a one-size fits all click approach that doesn't really take people from where they are and get them to where they need to go. i have seen life skills work well and i have seen students literally filling out mcdonald's applications in their life skills class. so you can't just quickly eradicate and we can't just think about this in an isolated silo the link, for example, that has been alluded
's a brutal event. for us it's a great cause but a crappy --. >> you are right. thank you so much. assembly man tom ammiano has his own story about bullying but you are the author of what we've been talking about today. >> it sounds trite, but all politics being personal, you've probably heard that before many times. in the case of this bill, that does ring true. i was on the bridge board for many years and meeting after meeting parents would come, particularly of teenagers who had jumped, and it was heart breaking and poignant and that feeling of helplessness that we all have, very reminiscent of this story and of your story in terms of what the parents go through and the inaction. and we finally were able to get a suicide deterrent plan and we're looking forward to getting that money authorized soon so that we can start construction. but as a kid in the 50's in newark, new jersey, i was, shall we say, a little fey, a little high strung, my mother used to say. i guess like a moth to the flame attracted all kinds of undesirable attention including from some of the teachers. we had a foo
, an effort to use good data in research, they have released a come pend yum of common bullying tools. that's also available online. we are doing these conversations with community and the president has convened now two bullying summits where we bring the best practices to bear and learn locally. we've been doing webinar series across the country, you can find the dates for those on the web site. tom also mentioned about school busses and we realize, right, because this is not just about teachers, this is not just about forward-looking superintendents or guidance councilors or mental health professionals in schools, i don't need to tell anyone in this room about what's been happening on school busses. we are in partnership with the nea and companies helping train bus drivers so they know what to do better. you've seen the ad council campaign on bullying, it's really about the civic will to deal with this, encouraging conversations at home, that kind of social campaign is important to do that, and to encourage young people not to stand by in silence. so much of this, if you are not the per
is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. families will testify it continues. it hits the community and now we have to continue to pull ourselves up and help our other daughter and the challenges of raising and parenting another child. you know, we can't just pull up in a shell. she has the right to have a childhood. she deserves to go to go to c
ideas you should never hesitate to call us. we're not a grant making arm in our division but we have the auspices of the department of justice so if it's not mean i'll make sure to funnel you to the right place so you can have that conversation. >> tom, what else, are there other best practices, other communities that stand out as you have traveled that resonate with you. >> like so many things, governor, it starts with leadership. the programs i look to and i say, i'd like my kid to go to this school, it starts out with clear leadership at the top. it then starts out with clear policy direction so that the rules are set out in a very clear and transparent way. it continues with partnerships so that there is, you know, there are community-based partners, a recognition that this isn't just a teacher responsibility, it's really a community responsibility. and it's like so many things, it's about culture development. you know, what is your institutional culture? i work with a lot of police departments in a different world where we're dealing with serious issues that have occurred a
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)